School failed Einstein/Outlier rich environment….

School failed Einstein/Outlier rich environment....

out·li·er
ˈoutˌlīər/Submit
noun
noun: outlier; plural noun: outliers
1.
a person or thing situated away or detached from the main body or system.
“less accessible islands and outliers”
a person or thing excluded from a group; an outsider.
GEOLOGY
a younger rock formation isolated among older rocks.
STATISTICS
a data point on a graph or in a set of results that is very much bigger or smaller than the next nearest data point.

Black swan theory
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A black swan, a member of the species Cygnus atratus
The black swan theory or theory of black swan events is a metaphor that describes an event that comes as a surprise, has a major effect, and is often inappropriately rationalized after the fact with the benefit of hindsight.
The theory was developed by Nassim Nicholas Taleb to explain:
The disproportionate role of high-profile, hard-to-predict, and rare events that are beyond the realm of normal expectations in history, science, finance, and technology
The non-computability of the probability of the consequential rare events using scientific methods (owing to the very nature of small probabilities)
The psychological biases that make people individually and collectively blind to uncertainty and unaware of the massive role of the rare event in historical affairs
Unlike the earlier philosophical “black swan problem,” the “black swan theory” refers only to unexpected events of large magnitude and consequence and their dominant role in history. Such events, considered extreme outliers, collectively play vastly larger roles than regular occurrences.[1] More technically, in the scientific monograph Lectures on Probability and Risk in the Real World: Fat Tails (Volume 1), Taleb mathematically defines the black swan problem as “stemming from the use of degenerate metaprobability”.[2]

6 degrees from understanding Shri Yukteswar

Yukteswar wrote The Holy Science in 1894.[20] In the introduction, he wrote:
The purpose of this book is to show as clearly as possible that there is an essential unity in all religions; that there is no difference in the truths inculcated by the various faiths; that there is but one method by which the world, both external and internal, has evolved; and that there is but one Goal admitted by all scriptures.[20] -wikipedia

Shivah Solomon: “His name meant yoked to Ishwar, notice how he is the first influence of the Beatles being on the top left, this is basically them categorizing their influences or gurus.  Yukteshwar was their first influence, also notice that nowhere do you see Paramahansa Yogananda…”

Regarding the role of the Guru, Yukteswar said:

Look, there is no point in blindly believing that after I touch you, you will be saved, or that a chariot from heaven will be waiting for you. Because of the guru’s attainment, the sanctifying touch becomes a helper in the blossoming of Knowledge, and being respectful towards having acquired this blessing, you must yourself become a sage, and proceed on the path to elevate your Soul by applying the techniques of sadhana given by the guru.[17]

Ishvara (Sanskrit Īśvara) is a theological concept in Hinduism translating to “lord“, applied to the “Supreme Being” or God in themonotheistic sense, or as an Ishta-deva in monistic thought.

Etymology[edit]

Look up ईश in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Much like “lord” (dominuskurios) in Western usage, the Sanskrit īśvará primarily (late Vedic Sanskrit) has a temporal meaning of “lord, master, prince”. It is in origin a nominalized adjective meaning “capable, able, being in control”, like īśa “owning, possessing” derived from a root īś- “to own, possess; rule over”, ultimately cognate with English own (Germanic *aigana-, PIE *aik-). The theological meaning “the Supreme Being” first arises in the Manu Smriti, while īśa is used as a name of Rudra somewhat earlier, in the Shvetashvatara Upanishad(c. 300 BCE), considered the first evidence of the development of that deity, the later Shiva, into a supreme, cosmological god.

In Saivite traditions of Hinduism, the term is used as part of the compound “Maheshvara” (“great lord”) as a name for Shiva. In Mahayana Buddhism it is used as part of the compound “Avalokiteśvara” (“lord who hears the cries of the world”), the name of a bodhisattva revered for her compassion. When referring to divine as female, particularly in Shaktism, the feminine Īśvarī is sometimes used.

the best way to take control over a people…

the best way to take control over a people...

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Creeping normality refers to the way a major change can be accepted as the normal situation if it happens slowly, in unnoticed increments, when it would be regarded as objectionable if it took place in a single step or short period. Examples would be a change in job responsibilities or a change in a medical condition.
Jared Diamond has invoked the concept (as well as that of landscape amnesia) in attempting to explain why in the course of long-term environmental degradation, Easter Island natives would, seemingly irrationally, chop down the last tree:
Gradually trees became fewer, smaller, and less important. By the time the last fruit-bearing adult palm tree was cut, palms had long since ceased to be of economic significance. That left only smaller and smaller palm saplings to clear each year, along with other bushes and treelets. No one would have noticed the felling of the last small palm.[1]